THE SPIRIT – Sounds from the Vortex

While THE SPIRIT hail from Saarbrücken, Germany, they sound like they were born in the metal Mecca of Gothenburg, Sweden.  It’s abundantly clear that DISSECTION are, by far, their main influence.  However, a closer ear can hear influences from other Swedish black/death metal bands such as UNANIMATED and SACRAMENTUM.

A handful of bands have tried to carry the torch left by the legendary DISSECTION, such as THULCANDRA, but none of them have come as close as THE SPIRIT.  On their debut album, Sounds from the Vortex, they essentially wrote the album that could’ve followed Storm of the Light’s Bane, and I do not make that statement haphazardly.

Sounds from the Vortex has the perfect balance of pure ferocity, melody, and, most importantly, that mysterious atmosphere of the classic albums that came out of Sweden in the mid to late 90’s.

Having said all of that, THE SPIRIT should also be praised for the endless prime riffing, instrumental prowess, and tight songwriting. Check out the barrage of ice that hits on the 4:09 mark on “The Clouds of Damnation.” “Cross the Bridge to Eternity” has unique riffing patterns reminiscent of something off of DARK TRANQUILLITY‘s The Mind’s I.

The album’s finishes out as strongly a possible in its final three songs.  Powerful and confident, these songs close out what is one of the best debuts in years.  If THE SPIRIT can replicate this level of excellence on album number two, their ascension is guaranteed. (Nuclear Blast Records)

LIK – Carnage

The glorious buzzsaw guitars that rip forth in the opening riff of album opener, “To Kill,” immediately bring to mind all of those sentimental, warm and fuzzy feelings you had jamming to DISMEMBER and ENTOMBED back in the day.  And it’s no coincidence that LIK (“corpse” in Swedish) are from Stockholm, Sweden.

On their second album, Carnage, LIK easily establish themselves as a true force to be reckoned with.  Like the instant classic that it is, the ten songs are consistently infectious and memorable.  Each successive listen will make you realize that this is one of the best death metal albums to come out in years.

The best part of Carnage is the instantaneous enjoyment that it brings.  It’s not a rehash or a ripoff of the legends but simultaneously a great homage and continuation of the Stockholm Swedish death metal legacy.

It should noted that the production, courtesy of Lawrence Mackrory (DARKANE, F.K.Ü) at Dugout Studios, is a thing of beauty.  The Boss Metal Zone guitar/bass tons are thick and ripping while the drums are natural and powerful in the mix.  Everything literally sounds loud (in a good way) without being abrasive.

While extreme metal vocalists can often blur into each other, Tomas Åkvik (vocals, guitar) has the deep roar but also the clear enunciation that David Vincent is famous for.

I know upon first listen, you may think LIK is merely a DISMEMBER-worship band but with successive listens, you’ll find that there is more that distinguishes them from their main influence.  (Metal Blade Records)

 

 

IMMORTAL – Northern Chaos Gods

After initially listening to the first couple seconds of IMMORTAL‘s comeback album, Northern Chaos Gods, you realize that you owe the band a huge apology for doubting them.  A raging storm of ice and snow blast forth in a way that only Bergen, Norway’s finest can produce.

Despite the departure of original vocalist and bassist/guitarist, Abbath, and him allegedly taking most of what was supposed to be the band’s next studio album for his solo album, IMMORTAL is intact and true to their legacy.  Demonaz takes on vocal duties in masterful fashion and, most importantly, returns to his rightful place recording guitars for the band. Peter Tägtgren (HYPOCRISY, PAIN) pulls double duty as producer and session bassist.

While it is accurate to say that IMMORTAL finds much inspiration in their colder, faster sound from around the mid-90’s, Northern Chaos Gods is not a total throwback or a regression.  The mastery and epic sound that the band honed so well in the 2000’s is still intact as evidenced by songs like “Gates to Blashyrkh” and “Mighty Ravendark.” The one characteristic that is not as strong as the hooks that were ever so present in their last couple of albums.  However, Northern Chaos Gods is still a satisfying and enjoyable album.

With Northern Chaos Gods, IMMORTAL continue to build on their legacy and prove that break ups, line up changes, lawsuits, and severe injuries cannot stop one of the greatest bands on the planet.  (Nuclear Blast Records)

GRUESOME – Twisted Prayers

How often does the band that is paying tribute to their idols go as far as to surpass them?  Well, GRUESOME‘s Twisted Prayers is one of those rare instances where the students becomes better than the master.  Modeled after the style of DEATH‘s leap forward, Spiritual Healing, GRUESOME perfectly capture the birth of progressive/technical death metal.

Not only are all the nuances, that only true fans could recognize and capture, but the damn riffs and hooks are just killer.  There are no drop offs throughout Twisted Prayers.  Thus, there is no need to highlight any songs.  Those beautiful instrumental runs and that heart pumping sense of urgency keep things moving.

Hell, you even have guitarist James Murphy, who played on Spiritual Healing, playing solos on “Crusade of Brutality” and “At Death’s Door” to add to the authenticity of the experience.

What is also important to note is that GRUESOME‘s guitar crunch here is perfection.  Also, Gus Rios‘ drums sound so natural and balanced in the mix.  Big props to producer Jarrett Pritchard for created such a modern, yet true death metal sound to the album.

Somewhere Chuck Shuldiner has a huge shit eating grin when he sees how GRUESOME is carrying on his legacy. Hail.  (Relapse Records)

 

NECROPHOBIC – Mark of the Necrogram

NECROPHOBIC prove that, as one of the proud remaining godfathers of Swedish black/death metal, they can always be relied on to create excellent albums.  The bottom line is that Mark of the Necrogram is the perfect NECROPHOBIC album.

All the hallmarks that the band has built their legacy can be found: the undeniable dark atmosphere, the melancholic melodies, the variety of songs, and the heartpounding tempos.  The greatest intangible that NECROPHOBIC bring to the table is that magic feeling, that mystery of their unique style of Swedish black/death metal.  You would think that a band that started in ’89 would’ve lost what made them special at some point along the way.  However, that is simply not the case with them.

The album opener/title track sets the tone beautifully with its unstoppable melodies and plowing momentum.  “Tsar Bomba” just has that special feeling that you can feel in your soul.  It’s quite a great anthem.  “Lamashtu” is perfect for a live setting with its momentum building and catchy vocal lines.  One listen to “Sacrosant” and you’ll be singing along to the chorus.  The middle section and excellent guitar solo by Sebastian Ramstedt in “Requiem for a Dying Sun” is pure magic.  NECROPHOBIC race to the finish with “From the Great Above to the Great Below” with a strong sense of urgency before smoldering into ashes with the instrumental “UndergÜngen.”

Mark of the Necrogram features strong performances from all band member but it should be pointed out that band leader/drummer Joakim Sterner is the heart and soul of NECROPHOBIC.  Additionally, his drumming is basically the playbook when it comes to this style of extreme metal.

Look, Mark of the Necrogram is yet another classic NECROPHOBIC album and another mandatory addition to your record collection.  Hail. (Century Media Records)

THE CROWN – Cobra Speed Venom

If we’re being honest, THE CROWN‘s last one, Death is Not Dead, was good but not good enough by the standard that the band have set with previous releases.  The good news is that Cobra Speed Venom is THE CROWN‘s best album since the stellar Possessed 13.  Furthermore, it ranks up there with the latter, Eternal Death and Death Race King.

THE CROWN‘s heart pounding and train flying off the rails style of raging metal is in full effect on Cobra Speed Venom.  The songwriting is damn near flawless.  Hook after hook along with the perfect blend of diversity across the album make for an enjoyable listening experience.  The dirty and ugly aspects of their sound along with the clean melodies all have the right balance in the mix.  Lemmy would be proud to not only hear how Magnus Olsfelt‘s bass sounds in the mix but his bulldozing performance.

Bonus points if you caught the little tribute to BATHORY on “In the Name of Death.”

There is really no need to further explain as to why THE CROWN at the top of their game with Cobra Speed Venom.  Buy or die!  (Metal Blade Records)

TRIBULATION – Down Below

Sweden’s TRIBULATION took a big step with 2015’s Children of the Night.  Their new one, Down Below, continues where its predecessor left off with a sound focused on incorporating traditional heavy metal, gothic rock/metal, and bigger riffs onto their Swedish death metal foundation.  The band continue to capitalize on the fundamentals that “feel” and atmosphere resonate deeper with fans.

TRIBULATION have improved in key areas.  First, they improved at creating spacing within each song for each instrument to have its own distinctive voice.  For much of  Down Below, each member is playing different parts coupled with plenty of twists and turns in each song, which creates the air of musicality.  Throw in pianos and synth effects (i.e. tolling bells) and you’ve got plenty of ear candy through out Down Below.   Please note that Johannes Andersson (vocals/bass) is an excellent bassist that makes a significant contribution with his playing.  Rarely is he simply playing the same riffs as rhythm guitars.

Speaking of dynamics and song structure, TRIBULATION aim higher to make each song an experience.  A song like “Lacrimosa” has a great bridge that feels like a haunted graveyard during the witching hour, which then takes off into a great guitar solo and eventually ends with quiet pianos.

Unfortunately, just like Children of the Night, Down Below loses momentum after the first few songs.  Both albums are sequenced in a similar fashion with the “big” songs at the top and the more subdued, melancholic songs thereafter.  While none of the latter on Down Below are necessarily bad, they simply aren’t as exciting as the former.  Thus, the album just kind of ends on a quiet note.

Overall, TRIBULATION are on the upswing and will undoubtedly only get bigger from here.  And in doing so, they are keeping the flame of Swedish death metal alive.  (Century Media Records)

LOCK UP – Demonization

In grindcore, there is a holy triumvirate: NAPALM DEATH, TERRORIZER, and LOCK UP.  It’s no coincidence that all three bands are related in history and members.  LOCK UP does the most in terms of honoring the legacy of the other two bands while sounding, arguably, the most fresh overall.

So should you care about the fourth album from a band, one that is essentially a side project, in their 18th year of existence?  The answer is a definitive “yes.” Demonization is all about godly riffs, intensity, and most important, excitement.  The feeling of a speeding training flying off the rails is invigorating.  Right from the start, the album starts rolling and never stops until the final note.  It’s unfair to single out songs to be highlighted as they are all of equal quality.  Just listen to the whole thing.

While underground metal super groups have become so common and often fail to live up to their hype, the gang of Shane Embury, Kevin Sharp, Nick Barker, and Anton Reisenegger are unequivocally delivering the goods.  Without a doubt, Demonization is one of 2017’s best releases.

Bow down to LOCK UP or be damned to a life of subpar grindcore.  (Listenable Records)

MORBID ANGEL – Kingdoms Disdained

Six years ago MORBID ANGEL released their most anticipated and ultimately most disappointing album, Illud Divinum Insanus.  Instead of the album being a return to the Domination-era sound or a continuation of the very obscure, Heretic, the band experimented with industrial, hardcore, and even rock influences.  Well, fans should be happy, and perhaps relieved, to know that Kingdoms Disdained is a return to pure death metal.

With the perpetually underrated Steve Tucker back in the fold, MORBID ANGEL have their best album since Formulas Fatal to the Flesh and Gateways to Annihilation.  Former guitarist Erik Rutan handled the production.  New drummer Scott Fuller does a solid job.

With full mastery and power, the band goes into full attack mode from the first note on “Piles of Little Arms.”  The riff that kicks in late at the 2:50 mark is godly.  “D.E.A.D.” is intentionally discordant, schizophrenic and suffocating.

The momentum of Kingdoms Disdained  then falls too much into a plodding pace and tone.  The riffing is overly busy without strong hooks.  There are dynamics but they don’t possess enough charisma and power to excite.  “Garden of Disdain” is essentially a little brother to “Where the Slime Live.”  Things continue to lose a bit of momentum with “The Righteous Voice” as the fast song sections are the only parts that keep it afloat.  Stand out riffs shake the plodding such as the song section that kicks in at the 3:37 mark of “The Pillars Crumbling.”  “Declaring New Law” is essentially a war chant.  It is the simplest and most straight forward track.

The action picks back up with “From the Hand of Kings” as the band focuses on what works well on the album, speed and brutality, as shallow as that may sound.  Closing track, “The Fall of Idols,” is gloriously intense and momentous.  Trey Azagtoth‘s guitar solo at the end is the sound of a behemoth falling to earth.

At the end of the day, Kingdoms Disdained is a good but not great album.  The magic moments are too few and far between for a band of MORBID ANGEL‘s legendary status.  (Silver Lining)

INTRONAUT – The Direction of Last Things

Intronaut - The Direction of Last ThingsLos Angeles’ sworn enemies of 4/4 time signatures, INTRONAUT, step up their game on album number four, The Direction of Last Things. Their extreme metal roots play the most prominent role in the album’s sound since the early days of the band as evidenced by the heavy riffing and extreme, distorted vocals.  Given that, INTRONAUT takes inspiration from their past and incorporates it into where they’ve currently progressed resulting in, arguably, their best album to date.

Opening song, “Fast Worms,” is a tour de force that embodies the compelling journey that is The Direction of Last Things – atmospheric passages, volcanic intensity, fantastic genre melding, and clockwork precision.  The hilarious music video reflects their piss taking/tongue in cheek attitude.

Digital Gerrymandering” is built on an awesome snaking riff that the band masterfully morphs through different time signatures and phrasing.  The tension that is built and then released with the clean vocal section is awesome.

On “The Pleasant Surprise,” INTRONAUT take thrash riffs and retool them into a very modern metal sound that is huge.  TESTAMENT and DEVIN TOWNSEND be damned.

The Unlikely Event of a Water Landing” is the band showcasing why they are one of the best “prog metal” bands on the planet.  Seemingly, two very different vibes with a guitar solo at the end that would make Jerry Cantrell proud.

Sul Ponticello” is pure soul.  Check out the vocals that come in at the 4:47 mark, and the song gets even better from there.

The title track is easily the biggest monster on the disc and carries this momentum of finality that doesn’t let up until The Direction of Last Things‘ conclusion.  The more you open your ears, the more you will hear all of the intricacies.  Check out the killer riff that comes in at the 1:15 mark.  So damn good.

City Hymnal” starts and ends in a fantastic cascade of sound that would draw envy from DEVIN TOWNSEND and JESU.

The Direction of Last Things is a union of well thought out riffing/song phrasing, impactful dynamics, and an always original delivery and style.  Bands like ENSLAVED and OPETH are still playing catch up in many ways as to how far ahead INTRONAUT have gone in their progressive journeys.  In the larger scope of things, metal needs more unique, stand alone albums such as The Direction of Last Things. (Century Media Records)